What is it with Spaniels?


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It’s hard to get a Spaniel to stay still, even when asleep they launch themselves in an instant when they think somethings about to happen.

They don’t go for a walk, they go for a run. Constantly quartering and finding feral tennis balls, bits of tennis balls and items made of rubber like bits of tyre inner tubes and so on – and on & on.

You can’t sit for a short rest. Before you can settle they jump on to the rock or stump you’ve chosen for your seat. It’s like they read your mind.

If you manage to sit they surround you hoping you are about to pull a sandwich out of your pack. If you don’t they will bark at you constantly until you get up and walk on!

They are driven to explore mud, ditches, bogs, shallow streams (they seem to have to be in the middle of a stream to take a drink) and of course rivers, canals, ponds, the sea.

Then there’s the brambles, bushes, snaggy twigs and other sticky bits of vegetation. I despair at times. There is a Spaniel aftermath for every walk! It consists of wet, muddy, foliage covered panting and thirsty bundles of sticks and brambles plus any bits of rubber they smuggle home.

I suppose this is how they like to express themselves – other dogs look on with a puzzled expression. I love Spaniels – good job I do!

Birch Woodland and Gritstone.


Despite the bright sunshine of the last few days it has been rather cold. The golden sunshine really lit up today’s visit to a Birch Woodland that borders wild heather moorland.

This woodland has many small Yorkshire Gritstone crags and boulders. There are signs of quarrying in past times. You can see rows of shallow holes chiselled into boulders that were used to split the rock into useful blocks.

The dogs love exploring the boulders especially when they can get to the height of my head and try for a face lick!

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